Refuting d’Aguesseau

Anjouists love to cite Henri François d’Aguesseau as evidence that a Prince of the Blood does not lose his right of succession by becoming a foreigner.  We will refute the claims made by d’Aguesseau.  Here is the text in question: [62r] February 1713. Observations of the Attorney General d’Aguesseau on a draft letters patent for … More Refuting d’Aguesseau

Henri IV: Frenchman

Anjouists love to erroneously claim that Henri IV, because he was born in Bearn, Kingdom of Navarre, was a foreigner or lost his quality as French. This is flatly wrong.  The Parlement de Paris ruled in 1505 that Bearnais were naturally French.  The general prosecutor for the Crown even went as far as to proclaim that … More Henri IV: Frenchman

Against Anjouism

We’ve heard the repeated claims of the Anjouists again and again. “There is no nationality requirement,” the say. “The blood right of Princes of the Blood supersedes the law of aubaine,” they say. The notion of “Fundamental Laws” emerged in the 16th century based on customs dating back centuries. The Inalienability of the Crown made … More Against Anjouism

Nationality and Henri IV

Nationality in the Ancien Regime The term “nationality” was not used in the Ancien Regime. However, there was a tradition and understanding of who was French (Regnicole) and who was not (etranger; aubain). The former was someone born in the kingdom or under the obedient lordships (vassals) of the king (jus soli) and who remained … More Nationality and Henri IV